The Many Benefits of Saunas

Saunas have been around for a long time and used properly can provide very real health benefits.  Like exercise heat is a stressor and has a strong effect on many body systems.   The key to obtaining the benefits is to understand that properly applied stress stimulates a positive adaptive response to the stressor.    Often referred to as “hyperthermic conditioning” applying heat through saunas on a regular basis causes adaptations that make it easier for your body to function when your body temperature is elevated. The adaptations include increased plasma volume and blood flow to your heart and muscles (which helps increase athletic endurance) along with increased muscle mass due to…
Read More

The Importance of Matching the Fitness Assessment to the Client’s Goal

The primary purpose of doing an assessment with a new personal training client is to establish a baseline to measure progress against over time.       Implicit in this purpose is that the measurement must be a reliable indicator of the client’s goal.      For example, if a client’s goal is to “get lean and long muscles but not get too big” as fitness professionals we know that in our world that means maintaining or slightly increasing muscle mass while reducing bodyfat levels.     As such a relevant assessment for this particular goal would be body composition analysis.       As important as the assessment itself is helping the client understand how the assessment relates to…
Read More

Golf Conditioning for Better Play and Injury Prevention

Golf is an incredibly popular sport, and it’s no longer just for retirees.   Unfortunately, many golfers do not adequately prepare their bodies for golf. Golfers are notorious for spending lots of money on clubs and gadgets, but they rarely take advantage of physical conditioning to enhance their performance and prevent injury. Golf requires mobility, strength, good muscle balance and stability. Consider that a typical day on the golf course can include swinging more than 100 times (for both practice and the actual game), leaning over 30–40 putts and bending 40–50 times to pick up balls.    So building golf specific strength is critical to performance and injury prevention. Primary Movements and…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 2

In the second part of this two part article on functional eccentric training we will take a look at the potential downsides of eccentric training, some of the traditional eccentric training techniques, and newly emerging systems available for eccentric training. Negative Effects of Eccentric Training As anyone who has done heavy eccentric weight training can attest eccentric training can result in strong delayed onset muscular soreness aka DOMS. In addition, research has proven that initially eccentric training can result in significant decreases in muscle strength and decreased proprioception during the acute period of 1 – 4 days after the training sessions. This is an important consideration for many populations including…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 1

Any discussion of functional training should start with a review of the S.A.I.D. principle -- Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand. SAID is the guiding principle of exercise physiology and program design. This means that exercises and programs need to be designed to produce the specific results desired. One of the most important aspects of specificity to consider is which types of muscular contractions are dominant in any specific functional outcome desired. For example downhill skiing requires significant eccentric loading of the lower body – particularly when skiing through moguls (bumps). So if we do NOT include eccentric exercise in a ski conditioning program it will not prepare people well for…
Read More

The Many Benefits of Saunas

Saunas have been around for a long time and used properly can provide very real health benefits.  Like exercise heat is a stressor and has a strong effect on many body systems.   The key to obtaining the benefits is to understand that properly applied stress stimulates a positive adaptive response to the stressor.    Often referred to as “hyperthermic conditioning” applying heat through saunas on a regular basis causes adaptations that make it easier for your body to function when your body temperature is elevated. The adaptations include increased plasma volume and blood flow to your heart and muscles (which helps increase athletic endurance) along with increased muscle mass due to…
Read More

The Importance of Matching the Fitness Assessment to the Client’s Goal

The primary purpose of doing an assessment with a new personal training client is to establish a baseline to measure progress against over time.       Implicit in this purpose is that the measurement must be a reliable indicator of the client’s goal.      For example, if a client’s goal is to “get lean and long muscles but not get too big” as fitness professionals we know that in our world that means maintaining or slightly increasing muscle mass while reducing bodyfat levels.     As such a relevant assessment for this particular goal would be body composition analysis.       As important as the assessment itself is helping the client understand how the assessment relates to…
Read More

Golf Conditioning for Better Play and Injury Prevention

Golf is an incredibly popular sport, and it’s no longer just for retirees.   Unfortunately, many golfers do not adequately prepare their bodies for golf. Golfers are notorious for spending lots of money on clubs and gadgets, but they rarely take advantage of physical conditioning to enhance their performance and prevent injury. Golf requires mobility, strength, good muscle balance and stability. Consider that a typical day on the golf course can include swinging more than 100 times (for both practice and the actual game), leaning over 30–40 putts and bending 40–50 times to pick up balls.    So building golf specific strength is critical to performance and injury prevention. Primary Movements and…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 2

In the second part of this two part article on functional eccentric training we will take a look at the potential downsides of eccentric training, some of the traditional eccentric training techniques, and newly emerging systems available for eccentric training. Negative Effects of Eccentric Training As anyone who has done heavy eccentric weight training can attest eccentric training can result in strong delayed onset muscular soreness aka DOMS. In addition, research has proven that initially eccentric training can result in significant decreases in muscle strength and decreased proprioception during the acute period of 1 – 4 days after the training sessions. This is an important consideration for many populations including…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 1

Any discussion of functional training should start with a review of the S.A.I.D. principle -- Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand. SAID is the guiding principle of exercise physiology and program design. This means that exercises and programs need to be designed to produce the specific results desired. One of the most important aspects of specificity to consider is which types of muscular contractions are dominant in any specific functional outcome desired. For example downhill skiing requires significant eccentric loading of the lower body – particularly when skiing through moguls (bumps). So if we do NOT include eccentric exercise in a ski conditioning program it will not prepare people well for…
Read More

The Many Benefits of Saunas

Saunas have been around for a long time and used properly can provide very real health benefits.  Like exercise heat is a stressor and has a strong effect on many body systems.   The key to obtaining the benefits is to understand that properly applied stress stimulates a positive adaptive response to the stressor.    Often referred to as “hyperthermic conditioning” applying heat through saunas on a regular basis causes adaptations that make it easier for your body to function when your body temperature is elevated. The adaptations include increased plasma volume and blood flow to your heart and muscles (which helps increase athletic endurance) along with increased muscle mass due to…
Read More

The Importance of Matching the Fitness Assessment to the Client’s Goal

The primary purpose of doing an assessment with a new personal training client is to establish a baseline to measure progress against over time.       Implicit in this purpose is that the measurement must be a reliable indicator of the client’s goal.      For example, if a client’s goal is to “get lean and long muscles but not get too big” as fitness professionals we know that in our world that means maintaining or slightly increasing muscle mass while reducing bodyfat levels.     As such a relevant assessment for this particular goal would be body composition analysis.       As important as the assessment itself is helping the client understand how the assessment relates to…
Read More

Golf Conditioning for Better Play and Injury Prevention

Golf is an incredibly popular sport, and it’s no longer just for retirees.   Unfortunately, many golfers do not adequately prepare their bodies for golf. Golfers are notorious for spending lots of money on clubs and gadgets, but they rarely take advantage of physical conditioning to enhance their performance and prevent injury. Golf requires mobility, strength, good muscle balance and stability. Consider that a typical day on the golf course can include swinging more than 100 times (for both practice and the actual game), leaning over 30–40 putts and bending 40–50 times to pick up balls.    So building golf specific strength is critical to performance and injury prevention. Primary Movements and…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 2

In the second part of this two part article on functional eccentric training we will take a look at the potential downsides of eccentric training, some of the traditional eccentric training techniques, and newly emerging systems available for eccentric training. Negative Effects of Eccentric Training As anyone who has done heavy eccentric weight training can attest eccentric training can result in strong delayed onset muscular soreness aka DOMS. In addition, research has proven that initially eccentric training can result in significant decreases in muscle strength and decreased proprioception during the acute period of 1 – 4 days after the training sessions. This is an important consideration for many populations including…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 1

Any discussion of functional training should start with a review of the S.A.I.D. principle -- Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand. SAID is the guiding principle of exercise physiology and program design. This means that exercises and programs need to be designed to produce the specific results desired. One of the most important aspects of specificity to consider is which types of muscular contractions are dominant in any specific functional outcome desired. For example downhill skiing requires significant eccentric loading of the lower body – particularly when skiing through moguls (bumps). So if we do NOT include eccentric exercise in a ski conditioning program it will not prepare people well for…
Read More

The Many Benefits of Saunas

Saunas have been around for a long time and used properly can provide very real health benefits.  Like exercise heat is a stressor and has a strong effect on many body systems.   The key to obtaining the benefits is to understand that properly applied stress stimulates a positive adaptive response to the stressor.    Often referred to as “hyperthermic conditioning” applying heat through saunas on a regular basis causes adaptations that make it easier for your body to function when your body temperature is elevated. The adaptations include increased plasma volume and blood flow to your heart and muscles (which helps increase athletic endurance) along with increased muscle mass due to…
Read More

The Importance of Matching the Fitness Assessment to the Client’s Goal

The primary purpose of doing an assessment with a new personal training client is to establish a baseline to measure progress against over time.       Implicit in this purpose is that the measurement must be a reliable indicator of the client’s goal.      For example, if a client’s goal is to “get lean and long muscles but not get too big” as fitness professionals we know that in our world that means maintaining or slightly increasing muscle mass while reducing bodyfat levels.     As such a relevant assessment for this particular goal would be body composition analysis.       As important as the assessment itself is helping the client understand how the assessment relates to…
Read More

Golf Conditioning for Better Play and Injury Prevention

Golf is an incredibly popular sport, and it’s no longer just for retirees.   Unfortunately, many golfers do not adequately prepare their bodies for golf. Golfers are notorious for spending lots of money on clubs and gadgets, but they rarely take advantage of physical conditioning to enhance their performance and prevent injury. Golf requires mobility, strength, good muscle balance and stability. Consider that a typical day on the golf course can include swinging more than 100 times (for both practice and the actual game), leaning over 30–40 putts and bending 40–50 times to pick up balls.    So building golf specific strength is critical to performance and injury prevention. Primary Movements and…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 2

In the second part of this two part article on functional eccentric training we will take a look at the potential downsides of eccentric training, some of the traditional eccentric training techniques, and newly emerging systems available for eccentric training. Negative Effects of Eccentric Training As anyone who has done heavy eccentric weight training can attest eccentric training can result in strong delayed onset muscular soreness aka DOMS. In addition, research has proven that initially eccentric training can result in significant decreases in muscle strength and decreased proprioception during the acute period of 1 – 4 days after the training sessions. This is an important consideration for many populations including…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 1

Any discussion of functional training should start with a review of the S.A.I.D. principle -- Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand. SAID is the guiding principle of exercise physiology and program design. This means that exercises and programs need to be designed to produce the specific results desired. One of the most important aspects of specificity to consider is which types of muscular contractions are dominant in any specific functional outcome desired. For example downhill skiing requires significant eccentric loading of the lower body – particularly when skiing through moguls (bumps). So if we do NOT include eccentric exercise in a ski conditioning program it will not prepare people well for…
Read More

The Many Benefits of Saunas

Saunas have been around for a long time and used properly can provide very real health benefits.  Like exercise heat is a stressor and has a strong effect on many body systems.   The key to obtaining the benefits is to understand that properly applied stress stimulates a positive adaptive response to the stressor.    Often referred to as “hyperthermic conditioning” applying heat through saunas on a regular basis causes adaptations that make it easier for your body to function when your body temperature is elevated. The adaptations include increased plasma volume and blood flow to your heart and muscles (which helps increase athletic endurance) along with increased muscle mass due to…
Read More

The Importance of Matching the Fitness Assessment to the Client’s Goal

The primary purpose of doing an assessment with a new personal training client is to establish a baseline to measure progress against over time.       Implicit in this purpose is that the measurement must be a reliable indicator of the client’s goal.      For example, if a client’s goal is to “get lean and long muscles but not get too big” as fitness professionals we know that in our world that means maintaining or slightly increasing muscle mass while reducing bodyfat levels.     As such a relevant assessment for this particular goal would be body composition analysis.       As important as the assessment itself is helping the client understand how the assessment relates to…
Read More

Golf Conditioning for Better Play and Injury Prevention

Golf is an incredibly popular sport, and it’s no longer just for retirees.   Unfortunately, many golfers do not adequately prepare their bodies for golf. Golfers are notorious for spending lots of money on clubs and gadgets, but they rarely take advantage of physical conditioning to enhance their performance and prevent injury. Golf requires mobility, strength, good muscle balance and stability. Consider that a typical day on the golf course can include swinging more than 100 times (for both practice and the actual game), leaning over 30–40 putts and bending 40–50 times to pick up balls.    So building golf specific strength is critical to performance and injury prevention. Primary Movements and…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 2

In the second part of this two part article on functional eccentric training we will take a look at the potential downsides of eccentric training, some of the traditional eccentric training techniques, and newly emerging systems available for eccentric training. Negative Effects of Eccentric Training As anyone who has done heavy eccentric weight training can attest eccentric training can result in strong delayed onset muscular soreness aka DOMS. In addition, research has proven that initially eccentric training can result in significant decreases in muscle strength and decreased proprioception during the acute period of 1 – 4 days after the training sessions. This is an important consideration for many populations including…
Read More

Functional Eccentric Training Part 1

Any discussion of functional training should start with a review of the S.A.I.D. principle -- Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand. SAID is the guiding principle of exercise physiology and program design. This means that exercises and programs need to be designed to produce the specific results desired. One of the most important aspects of specificity to consider is which types of muscular contractions are dominant in any specific functional outcome desired. For example downhill skiing requires significant eccentric loading of the lower body – particularly when skiing through moguls (bumps). So if we do NOT include eccentric exercise in a ski conditioning program it will not prepare people well for…
Read More